Ashleigh Banfield

Published : Aug 26 2013 | Modified : Nov 10 2016

Ashleigh Banfield is a News anchor, Canadian American. She currently works at CNN, New York. She was born in Manitoba in 1967 to Elizabeth and John, her mother is from Holland and her father is Canadian. She is known for her famous "rectangular eyeglasses, the trademark that catches attention since she joined the national media scene.

She had refractive lens exchange surgery while on vacation. It’s the first time in two decades that she’s been able to function without wearing her signature glasses. The surgery essentially replaces your natural lens with an artificial lens, making it possible to go without reading glasses.

A distinct journalist:

Banfield is an Emmy Award winner, who has covered countless number of breaking news across the nation and internationally too. Ashleigh and her distinct journalistic style is the perfect fit for any news station. Before joining CNN, she was a correspondent at ABC News contributing for the shows Good Morning America, Nightline, and 20/20.

Early life and education:

Born in the year 1967, Ashleigh attended Balmoral Hall School which was a university preparatory school in Manitoba, she left it in 1985, then she graduated from Queen’s University finishing her Bachelor degree in Political Science and French, and later studied Advanced French at the University of British Columbia where she graduated in 1992.

Relationships:

She is married to Howard Gould, a real estate financier in 2004. He is the founder of Equator Environmental, a carbon credit trading company. They met while they were both walking their dogs in Central Park, Banfield with two Westies and Gould with two pugs. The wedding took place on a wooden yacht at the Royal Lake of the Woods Yacht Club in Canada, they live in Connecticut now. The couple, who are now divorced, have two sons, Jay and Ridley. She became a naturalized U.S. citizen on October 24, 2008.

2015, Ashleigh was engaged to her boyfriend of over two years, Chris Haynor, he popped the question in August while the pair were on vacation in Ontario, Canada with Banfield's two young sons.

Career and achievements:

Ashleigh Banfield started her career in journalism in Canada in 1988, when she joined as reporter at CJBN in Ontario and later moved to CKY station and subsequently to CFRN in Alberta. She then shifted to CICT-TV and did freelancing as associate producer for the World News Tonight show at ABC. She covered a lot of summits in Russia, Vancouver and the US. She also worked for KDFW-TV and later joined MSNBC and then moved on to truTV after which she joined ABC News.

While working for the Fox affiliate KDFW-TV, she received the Emmy Award for Best News Anchor in appreciation of her reporting on the ‘Cadet Killers’. She also received the Texas Associate Press Award for the ‘To Serve and Survive’ series. She received Emmy Award for her coverage of the September 11 terrorist attacks for NBC News. She has produced and created the popular prime time series ‘Disorder in the Court’ for truTV. She won the National Headliner Award for her reporting on the war on terror from 2001 to 2004, covering countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, and Israel. She also won the IRIS awards for Best of Festival and Best News Documentary categories in 1994.

Recently Ashleigh Banfield quit from her popular early morning show, Early Start in CNN and joined the 11 a.m. show as a replacement for Kyra Phillips, who used to anchor the show. Banfield is quite popular for her grabbing remarks both controversial and positive natured, since she started her career in the national media. Off the screen, she is a laid out personality preferring to spend her leisure time heli skiing, and sleeping.

Overcoming NBC:

Ashleigh said once that she was office-less for ten months, she had no phone nor a computer. For ten months she had to go to work everyday and ask where she could sit and she could use somebody's desk if they didn't show up that day.After those ten months, she was finally given a office, it was a tape closet actually, but that was a progress for her. They cleared the tapes out for her and put a desk, TV, a computer and a phone in there.

She said that the message was clear, no appreciation, however they wouldn't let her leave. She remembers that she begged to be let out of her contract for seventeen months but NBC's news president wouldn't allow it. She asked why they would keep her if she had no use for them. She thought that they kept her so as not to go to another station with her caliber and make success of what she had. She mentioned that she would never forgive them for what they did, for keeping her in the warehouse until they decided to dispose her.

Voice of the victims:

Once upon a time in 2015 on her show at CNN, she let a sexual assault victim's statement public to speak for itself, she spent the first half an hour of her show reading loud the women's words, the accident occurred at stanford university on the hands of someone called Brock Turner, 23 years old, who was sentenced to just six months while he already spent 14 years of his life in state prison.

She spent above 20 minutes of the show reading out loud the victim's statement that exceeded 6000 words excluding the graphic parts to be read on air, the victim was going to party with her sister and she woke up covered in dry blood and bandages and found out that while she was unconscious, Turner had sexually assaulted her behind a dumpster.

Banfield had some applaud and recognition for her courageous move to make the victim’s words be heard on air and reach out to more people. Nearly 5 million people read the letter over the weekend, according to BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith.

By using BiJog.com you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Published contents by users are under Creative Commons License. BiJog.com , All Rights Reserved. 0.12